Ecoguard Biosciences: pest & vegetation management solutions Ecoguard Biosciences: pest & vegetation management solutions Ecoguard Biosciences: pest & vegetation management solutions Ecoguard Biosciences: pest & vegetation management solutions Ecoguard Biosciences: pest & vegetation management solutions Ecoguard Biosciences: pest & vegetation management solutions Ecoguard Biosciences: pest & vegetation management solutions Ecoguard Biosciences: pest & vegetation management solutions Ecoguard Biosciences: pest & vegetation management solutions Ecoguard Biosciences: pest & vegetation management solutions Ecoguard Biosciences: pest & vegetation management solutions Ecoguard Biosciences: pest & vegetation management solutions Ecoguard Biosciences: pest & vegetation management solutions Ecoguard Biosciences: pest & vegetation management solutions
Tel: +27 11 463 6057   Fax: +27 21 871 1025   Email: ecoinfo@ecoguard.co.za

Ecoguard Species


Acacia mearnsii (Black wattle)

Acacia mearnsii is a fast-growing, extremely invasive leguminous tree native to Australia. Common names for it include black wattle, Acácia-negra (Portuguese), Swartwattel (Afrikaans), Uwatela (Zulu). This plant is now known as one of the worst invasive species in the world.

An evergreen tree growing 5-10m high, black wattle has dark olive-green finely hairy leaves. Pale yellow or cream spherical flowers in large fragrant sprays blooming from August to September. Fruits are dark brown, finely haired pods.

Black wattle has invaded grasslands, competing with and reducing indigenous species, and reducing grazing land for wild and domestic animals.

Reference:  www.invasives.org.za

 


Registered products:

Product Documentation:

Acacia melanoxylon (Blackwood)

Australian blackwood has been introduced to many countries for forestry plantings and as an ornamental tree. It now is present in Africa, Asia, Europe, Indian Ocean, the Pacific Ocean, South America and the United States. It is a declared noxious weed species in South Africa.

Sapwood may range in colour from straw to grey-white with clear demarcation from the heartwood. The heartwood is golden to dark brown with chocolate growth rings. The timber is generally straight grained but may be wavy or interlocked. The wood is lustrous and possesses a fine to medium texture.

The name of the wood may refer to dark stains on the hands of woodworkers, caused by the high levels of tannin in the timber.

Reference:  Wikipedia

 


Registered products:

Product Documentation:

Acacia saligna (Port jackson)

An evergreen tree, growing 3-7m high, with blue-green turning bright green leaves. Bright yellow, globe-shaped flowers bloom from August to November. Brown pods with hardened, whitish margins.

In South Africa, it proliferated at an uncontrollable rate, having been introduced in the nineteenth century to produce tan bark and to stabilise the sands of the Cape Flats outside Cape Town after the indigenous bush had largely been cut down for firewood. In addition to replacing indigenous fynbos vegetation, it also hampers agriculture. 

References:  www.invasives.org.za  Wikipedia


Registered products:

Product Documentation:

Solanum mauritianum (Bugweed)

A shrub or small tree up to 4m high covered with whitish-felty hairs. Dull green leaves that are velvety above and white-felty beneath which emit a strong smell when bruised. Purple flowers in compact, terminal clusters on densely felty stalks up to 10cm long all year round. Spherical berries which start off green and turn yellow, in compact terminal clusters. Hairy leaves and stems are a respiratory tract and skin irritant. Unripe fruits are poisonous.

Alternative common names:
bugtree, flannel weed, woolly nightshade (English); luisboom, groot bitterappel (Afrikaans); uBhoqo, umbanga banga (isiZulu)


Registered products:

Product Documentation:

Acacia cyclops (Rooikrans)

Native to Australia, it is found in locations exposed to coastal winds, red-eyed wattle grows as a dense, dome shaped shrub; this helps protect against salt spray, sand-blast and erosion of soil at the roots. When sheltered from the wind, it tends to grow as a small tree, up to seven metres high. Like many other Acacia species, red-eyed wattle has phyllodes rather than true leaves. The phyllodes range from four to eight centimetres long, and from six to twelve millimetres wide. Its flower heads are bright yellow spherical clusters. Very few flower heads are produced at a time, but flowering occurs over a long period, from early spring to late summer. This is unusual for Acacia species, which normally flower in one brief but impressive display.

Both the common and species names refer to the appearance of the pods when first open in late spring: each shiny black seed is encircled by a thick orange-red stalk, resembling a bloodshot eye.

Red-eyed wattle can be used to help stabilise coastal sands. It was introduced into Africa for this purpose, but it has spread rapidly and is now a serious pest in southern Africa, where it is known as rooikrans (in Afrikaans, "red garland"). The introduction of the gall-forming cecidomyiid Dasineura dielsi as a biological control has had limited success in the effective control of this weed.

Reference:  Wikipedia


Registered products:
Click here to view all registered products or click individual links below

Product Documentation: